Tag Archives: Gelli plate printing

Wildacres Walls

Wall #1 4x6 inches Acrylic Gelli plate print on paper from hand-cut foam stamp, embellished with ink and oil pastel ©2016 Lucinda Howe NFS

Wall #1
4×6 inches
Acrylic Gelli plate print on paper from hand-cut foam stamp, embellished with ink and oil pastel
©2016 Lucinda Howe
NFS

During the week of July 11-18, 2016, I was artist in residence at Wildacres Retreat in the North Carolina mountains. The residency consists of the use of a private cabin and meals in the dining hall for the week. My project was to learn more about Gelli plate printing using inspiration from the area. I am deeply grateful to the Blumenthal Foundation and the staff at Wildacres for the opportunity to learn and grow in such a verdant and peaceful environment.

Gelli Plate printing is a process of creating monotypes without a press. Stencils, stamps, and rubber-tip tools add texture. Printing one layer over another adds depth. The results are unpredictable. It’s possible to create finished works of art by this process, but in the learning stage, my efforts are mostly collage fodder.

The grounds of Wildacres provided much inspiration. Looking for signature details and texture, I focused on the amazing stone walls. Each wall has a different design. Some are rough and rustic and others are smooth and tightly fitted. There must have been a dozen masons building over the years, each working in a unique style.

After making photos and drawings of several walls, I cut stencils and foam stamps to use in the printing process. I applied two colors of acrylic paint to a 6x6 inch Gelli Plate with a brayer.

After making photos and drawings of several walls, I cut stencils and foam stamps to use in the printing process. I applied two colors of acrylic paint to a 6×6 inch Gelli Plate with a brayer.

 

I added texture with a hand-made foam stamp and a rubber-tip tool.

I added texture with a hand-made foam stamp and a rubber-tip tool.

 

I pressed a piece of paper over the plate with a brayer and pulled the print.

I pressed a piece of paper over the plate with a brayer and pulled the print.

 

I pulled a second "ghost" print to lift the remaining paint.

I pulled a second “ghost” print to lift the remaining paint.

 

The results of the two pulls are very different.   Sometimes the ghost print is closer to the effect I want.

The results of the two pulls are very different.   Sometimes the ghost print is closer to the effect I want.

I’m still experimenting with this process and will show more in next week’s post. I can also see that it will take a while to integrate this new process into my regular art practice. In the meantime, it’s fun to be learning something new! And so may it be for you.

Sections of Walls Gelli plate prints with hand-cut stencils and stamps

Sections of Walls
Gelli plate prints with hand-cut stencils and stamps

Posted in Acrylics Also tagged , |

Gelli Plate Obsession

Nandinas #1 8x8 inches Acrylic on black & white photocopy ©2016 Lucinda Howe NFS

Nandinas #1
8×8 inches
Acrylic on black & white photocopy
©2016 Lucinda Howe
NFS

I started using a new tool this week, a Gelli Printing Plate. It’s a flexible surface for making monoprints and monotypes without a press using acrylic paints.

I’ve been watching instructional videos and experimenting with texture, stencils, stamps, and leaf prints. There’s a learning curve to discovering what paints work well and how much paint to apply to the plate. I’ve printed lots of plain copier paper that may (or may not) be useful later as collage elements.

This process makes me think in layers, in reverse when using letters, in terms of transparency or opacity of paints. The fun is in the uncertainty of outcome, the surprise when the print is pulled. I can see that Gelli printing may be additive. Even so, I won’t suddenly become a printmaker.

As with any other new tool or technique, I need some focused time for learning and practicing before I can claim it as my own.  First efforts look like the instructor’s work, and aren’t satisfying. But as I use my favorite colors and shapes, the work will begin to look like mine. Eventually I will find ways to incorporate Gelli printing into my work along with other techniques. When that happens, I’ll know it has found a place in my toolbox.

Posted in Acrylics Also tagged |